Thursday, August 30, 2012

River Rapids

River Rapids, 8 x 16, oil on panel, L. Daniel © 2012

Today Plein Air Austin met up at a park on the San Marcos River, about 30 miles south of town. It was great to be back painting outside (after a little hiatus on my part), and the river didn't disappoint. The water was smooth as glass above the rapids and thundered mightily through the rocks as it traveled downward. Every now and then, a kayaker would entertain by running this little shoot. It was a lovely morning to say the least. :)

5 comments:

Martha Lever said...

You are a fabulous painter, Laurel. Thanks you for sharing your beautiful art. Loved looking at your plein air set up and straining my eyes to see your palette colors.

Kathy Cousart said...

Beautifully done Laurel! I can just feel the water rushing and you in your element smiling. Love this!

Tracey Mardon said...

Just gorgeous, we all wish we could have been there with you!

maalari ja piirtäjä said...

Terveisiä Suomesta, todella hieno maalaus, ONNITTELEN

Jackie Champion said...

Hello! I'll be looking forward for your other posts. Keep it up! This blog could really help me out with my business. Anyway, all of the designs are really one-of-a-kind and it really is worth its price. This is definitely going to be a hit for Asian art lovers. Wow! This is cool. Thank you so much for sharing this one. You have such an awesome page! Most Renaissance sources, in particular Vasari, credited northern European painters of the 15th century, and Jan van Eyck in particular, with the "invention" of painting with oil media on wood panel. However, Theophilus (Roger of Helmarshausen?) clearly gives instructions for oil-based painting in his treatise, On Various Arts, written in 1125. At this period it was probably used for painting sculptures, carvings and wood fittings, perhaps especially for outdoor use. Early Netherlandish painting in the 15th century was, however, the first to make oil the usual painting medium, and explore the use of layers and glazes, followed by the rest of Northern Europe, and only then Italy. Early works were still panel paintings on wood, but around the end of the 15th century canvas became more popular, as it was cheaper, easier to transport, and allowed larger works. Venice, where sail-canvas was easily available, led the move. The popularity of oil spread through Italy from the North, starting in Venice in the late 15th century. By 1540 the previous method for painting on panel, tempera, had become all but extinct, although Italians continued to use fresco for wall paintings, which was more difficult in Northern climates. At our May Fine Art Auction on May 19, 2011, the top lot, “A Spanish Dancer” painted by American Impressionist, William Merritt Chase, sold for $105,300. Circa 1896 , in white dress, oil on wood panel, 14" x 9 3/4", 17 3/4" x 13 1/2" in original carved gilt wood frame. This work is included in Ronald G. Pisano's The Complete Catalogue of Known and Documented Work by William Merritt Chase (1849-1916)Vol 4, F.52.
Oil paintings MA